Scott Monty

Scott Monty

Apple Pay and Google Inbox launch, John Oliver calls for more interesting Supreme Court coverage, Facebook goes old school with Rooms, Twitter wants your Digits as part of its Fabric, audience ages across social networks, Uber has (another) PR problem on its hands, ROI metrics require math, The Guardian builds out editorial teams while the Mail Online makes its editorial staff moonlight as ad creators, Microsoft is the sheriff of the Internet and more, it's This Week in Digital.

A roundup of relevant links affecting our industry.

Each week, I compose a newsletter that includes a series of links about current events and trends in the worlds of technology, social media, mobile, digital communications and marketing in order to keep leaders up to date on changes, newsworthy items and content that might be useful in your job. And now you have the option of just subscribing to this newsletter if you wish.

If you’re on Flipboard, you can get these links by subscribing to the This Week in Digital Magazine.

This week, we're pleased to feature a new section that acknowledges the growing importance of brands, start-ups and consumers joining forces to create new business models and solve problems. We're calling this section Collaborative Economy.


  • A report from E&Y finds that CMOs and chief sales officers need to accelerate change. Of particular interest: "CMOs focus too little on understanding the customer or enhancing their experience, while many CSOs emphasize short-term targets to the exclusion of strategy, innovation and longer-term connections." (MediaPost)
  • Apple Pay launched this week, meaning that thousands of hipsters can leave home without those pesky wallets. (New York Times)
    • The joke will be on them when the Apple Watch launches, requiring them to don yet one more thing. Is a wallet really that much trouble?


[NOTE: both of the above pieces are lengthy, but deserve the time spent with them, due to the importance and depth of this development.]

Collaborative Economy

Metrics / Measurement / Big Data

Legal / HR

  • Remember the case in which the appellant claimed that Mark Zuckerberg gave him 84% of Facebook? Well, now Facebook is suing that guy's lawyers for fraud, claiming that they should have known that his documentation was forged and dropped the case. (WSJ)


Essential Reading / Listening / Watching

Image credit: Wikimedia

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