Scott Monty

 

Omnicom and Publicis couldn't keep things together - promises broken

The merger that wasn't, the ads that Facebook doesn't want you to see, the importance of video and the rise of podcasting, from hashtag to shopping cart, hooking up or linking in, Tumblr needs traction with Madison Ave., the FTC cracks down on Snapchat, the NLRB may have something to say about your social media policy, Kevin Spacey on storytelling and more, it's This Week in Digital.

A roundup of relevant links affecting our industry.

Each week, I compose a newsletter that includes a series of links about current events and trends in the worlds of technology, social media, mobile, digital communications and marketing in order to keep leaders up to date on changes, newsworthy items and content that might be useful in their jobs.

If you have additional links, sources or ideas that might be helpful, I'd encourage you to add some via a comment below. And if you’re on Flipboard, you can get these links by subscribing to the This Week in Digital Magazine.


Industry







Platforms




MeUndies and the Facebook censorship


Measurement/Metrics/Big Data





Legal/HR





Content






Essential Reading/Watching/Listening


  • This week at a lecture at Harvard, Andrew Sullivan tore up the earned media world with a controversial talk: "How Advertising Defeated Journalism," in which he opined that because journalists haven't figured out how to drive subscriptions to their content, sites that rely on advertising are more successful. He also has some choice words for native advertising, sponsored content and branded content, calling it "naughty." (Digiday)
  • David Armano takes another angle, arguing that the average person doesn't discern between paid and earned media. To them, it's about content, and it's the responsibility of journalists (and brands) to burnish their reputation. (Logic + Emotion)
  • For a look at how we got where we are, a look at two decades of warning from a former P&G CEO reflects on how tech took a bite out of the advertising industry. (AdAge)


    Image credit: Thomas Hawk (Flickr)
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