Scott Monty

 

Many a doctrine is like a window pane. We see truth through it but it divides us from truth. ~Khalil Gibran

The FCC wants your Internet, the New York Times fires its editor and gets reflective with a major report, the maturation of Facebook on Zuckerberg's 30th, brand tweets cause actions online and offline, deleting Google results in the EU, the state of big data, a social media law final exam, the shortening of wire stories, corporate blogs making a comeback, the marketing funnel is dead and more, it's This Week in Digital.

A roundup of relevant links affecting our industry.

Each week, I compose a newsletter that includes a series of links about current events and trends in the worlds of technology, social media, mobile, digital communications and marketing in order to keep leaders up to date on changes, newsworthy items and content that might be useful in their jobs.


If you have additional links, sources or ideas that might be helpful, I'd encourage you to add some via a comment below. And if you’re on Flipboard, you can get these links by subscribing to the This Week in Digital Magazine.

Industry

Share of time spent online, by device and category by comScore and MarketingCharts.com


Platforms


Measurement/Metrics/Big Data


Legal/HR


Content

  • With more and more content flooding the Internet, it's no surprise that content shock is looming. But what will happen to society and its literacy as we increasingly rely on visual communications? (Geoff Livingston) 
  • Similarly, let's hope you don't have a long complex story to tell. The editor for Reuters America tells staff that most stories need to be shorter than 500 words. (Talking Biz News) 
  • But not all is lost: consumers do appreciate original content from brands, and the corporate blog is making a comeback amid a push to build a direct relationship with consumers, according to a WP Engine study. (Twist Image) 
    • 46% of consumers read the blogs of their favorite brands 
    • 40% believe there are negative effects if brands do not provide up-to-date content on their blogs. 
    • 40% prefer to read content directly from a company blog rather than a news magazine or website. 
    • If you're curious as to the next phase of viral headlines, check out these lessons from the most popular headlines. (Contently) 

Essential Reading/Watching/Listening



    Image credit: Lotus Carroll (Flickr)
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