Scott Monty

 

Lotus Carroll's "Quiet Conversations" is a reminder of everything wrong wtih #myNYPD

Net neutrality rules proposed, the NYPD step into an unintended meme, Facebook posts huge mobile growth and reveals a tool for journalists, Twitter releases new profiles to all users, Google+ loses its biggest champion, a tool to graph reader sentiment, General Mills reverses course on lawsuits and likes, the secrets to great content marketing and more, it's This Week in Digital.

A roundup of relevant links affecting our industry.

Each week, I compose a newsletter that includes a series of links about current events and trends in the worlds of technology, social media, mobile, digital communications and marketing in order to keep leaders up to date on changes, newsworthy items and content that might be useful in their jobs.

If you have additional links, sources or ideas that might be helpful, I'd encourage you to add some via a comment below. And if you’re on Flipboard, you can get these links by subscribing to the This Week in Digital Magazine.

Industry

  • The FCC is proposing new rules for network neutrality, using such subjective terminology as a "commercially reasonable" standard for network management - whatever that means. (Electronic Frontier Foundation) 
  • A study by New Voice Media indicates that US customers are twice as likely as UK customers to spread negative stories about poor customer service, but British consumers are more likely to stop doing business with a company as a result of poor service. (Beyond Philosophy) 
  • The New York Police Department tried to create a meme with its #myNYPD hashtag, but it backfired when angry residents posted their own perspective of the public service, and it even spread to other cities. (CNN) 



Platforms

Facebook's mobile MAUs for Q1 2014 top 1 billion


Measurement/Metrics/Big Data


Legal/HR


Content



Essential Reading/Watching/Listening

  • Google does more than search, email, YouTube and Drive. For a look under the hood, check out 14 Google Trends You Didn't Know Existed and discover ways of digging into data, inspiring thought leadership and trends that matter to your industry. (Mashable) 
  • Mitch Joel sits down with Stephen Rappaport to discuss winning digital metrics that matter in SPOS #406. (Twist Image) 
  • A look at Airbnb as a disruptor in an established market, and what it means for incumbents and their need to collaborate, rather than to defend. (OliverBlanchard.net) 
  • The real reason newly-minted MBAs want to work for Goldman Sachs is not money. (Harvard Business Review) 
  • When is it the right moment? Whenever. (Seth's Blog) 

Commentary

Enough has been written about the #myNYPD fiasco this week. We've seen previous gaffes from major brands who quickly learned that companies and organizations that come upon the scene to campaign their way into conversations will fail. Ultimately, those who listen and engage on a regular basis - and who do so respectfully and with a desire to meet their audience's needs - will succeed.

Using the longstanding cocktail party analogy, you can't barge in the door, start talking all about yourself and expect people to shower you with accolades. Especially if your brand has a questionable reputation.


Image credit: Lotus Carroll (Flickr)
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